Current Exhibitions


Urban Chatter:
Sharon Kerry-Harlan

June 8-October 20, 2019

Using thread and sun-baked cloth, “the density of contemporary city living,” provides the inspiration for Kerry-Harlan’s "Urban Chatter" series. The figures and faces seem to meld abstraction, African sculptures and ritual masks among mid-century urban music references from the Harlem jazz scene.

Born in Miami, the artist splits her time between Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, and Hollywood, Florida. She received a Bachelor of Arts from Marquette University and studied art at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design.


Do Not Bleach: Stephanie Brown

June 8-October 20, 2019

Through a series of mixed media installations, "Do Not Bleach" expresses and encourages melanin positivity, whether one is dark-skinned, light-skinned, or somewhere in between. The show will also feature a selfie interactive where visitors are encouraged to try on one of her signature “Do Not Bleach” T-shirts and take a photo. Shirts will be available for purchase in the Appleton Store and are part of Brown’s public art campaign that allows people to advocate for their melanin.

Brown is a Jamaican descendant born and raised in south Florida. She holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography from Savannah College of Art, as well as a master’s degree in Interdisciplinary Arts and a Museum Studies certificate from the University of Michigan.


Mobile Photography Exhibition

July 2-September 22, 2019

Photos collected during the 2019 Mobile Photography contest, covering three categories: Landscapes, In the Museum, and My Kid Took That, with a special display for the top photo in each category.


Artistic Legacy: The Story of Arthur I. Appleton
and The Appleton Museum of Art

Ongoing

Ever wondered where the Appleton Museum of Art got its name, or how the museum found a home in Ocala? Stroll through the history of the Appleton Family and the museum to learn all about Marion County's cultural gem.


Art for the Afterlife: Chinese Funerary Objects

Ongoing

Historically, elite individuals in Chinese society were buried with all of the everyday items that they might need in the next realm. Objects such as clay servants and musicians, as well as a finely glazed Tang Dynasty ceramic horse and stunning tomb guardian figurines, make up this display from the Appleton’s permanent collection.